pupil premium

The Pupil Premium is funding provided to schools that is in addition to the funding based on factors such as pupil numbers. It is allocated according to the number of pupils on roll who are eligible for free school meals (FSM), an allocation for each pupil who has been "Looked After" (in the care of the local authority) for 6 months or more and for children from families with parents in the Armed Forces. Funding also includes pupils who have been eligible for free school meals within the past 6 years . Pupil Premium funding is given to schools so that they can support their disadvantaged pupils and reduce the attainment gap between them and their peers.

Schools can decide how the Pupil Premium is spent, since they are able to decide what additional provision or support should be made for the individual children in their schools. All schools are accountable for how they have used the additional funding to support children from low-income families. This information must be published on the school website. This section sets out to show you how our pupil premium funding was used, the difference it has made, and an outline of how we intend to use it in future.

We can assure parents and carers that all matters regarding who is entitled to extra support and how and when we use funding, which derives from the pupil premium are treated with discretion and in confidence. We can also assure all parents and carers that we do not assume that being entitled to free school meals means a child will be academically less able or be more likely to have special educational needs. It may mean that a child will have more restricted access to additional opportunities such as music tuition or coaching, excursions and holidays, concerts and performances, equipment, books and IT. Financial difficulty may mean that a child (or family) has lower aspirations or self esteem and for example, may not see themselves at university or following a pathway to one of the professions.

We use our pupil premium, along with all of our financial and human resources to do all we can to ensure that children at our school have equality of access to the wide and rich range of opportunities that we offer and to see themselves as able to learn, achieve, aspire and excel.

Brindishe Schools Pupil Premium Funding Grant* for 2016 – 2017 is as follows:

Brindishe Green  £277 200
Brindishe Manor £147 840
Brindishe Lee    £47 520

*These figures do not include sums claimed for individual children who have Looked After or post-Looked After status.

This is how we use our pupil premium funding along with our other sources of funding to provide :

  • high levels of teaching assistant support so that most classes have at least two full time adults most of the time for every 30 children and our ratio of adults to pupils is  usually1:15
  • teaching assistants who are fully trained and targeted to boost learning and making sure that their input has impact on individual children’s progress and achievement
  • additional individual or small group teaching sessions for those children who need a boost to their learning in order to reach their potential especially in reading, writing or maths and especially at the highest levels (these sessions are known as booster classes)
  • high quality readily available IT and Managed or Virtual Learning Environment so that all children can access their learning and guidance and support at school and at home or in the local library
  • extra support from an Educational Psychologist, Specific Learning Difficulties ( SpLD) Team and a  Speech and Language Therapist so that children’s learning needs are clearly identified and we receive advice on how to help children overcome cognitive, social, emotional or psychological barriers to their learning
  • support from our Attendance, Safeguarding and Welfare Officer to meet the needs of children and families in challenging circumstances
  • access to Place2Be – a school based therapeutic counselling service for vulnerable children and families
  • high quality and focused training in how to promote effective learning for all of our teaching and support staff
  • very careful methods for measuring and tracking the progress of all of our children to make sure that if a child is entitled to free school meals or is looked after or disadvantaged in some other way we do not expect lower rates of progress or achievement.
  • subsidised ‘extras’ and enrichment opportunities such as music tuition, educational visits, residentials, coaching, out-of school clubs and the purchase of specialist resources and equipment eg musical instruments

Key Stage 2 Progress Data 2016

Brindishe Green School serves a very disadvantaged socio-economic catchment area with attainment on entry expected to be well below the national expectations

Reading: The progress measure for reading was +2.57. The 44 disadvantaged pupils had a progress measure of +2.72.

Writing: The progress measure for writing was +1.49. The 44 disadvantaged pupils had a progress measure of +0.83. Maths: The progress measure for maths was +4.53. This places the school in the top 5% for progress in maths. The 44 disadvantaged pupils had a progress measure of +4.78.

The progress of pupils with disadvantages at the end of KS 2 was above national in all areas and very well above national in Reading and Maths

Brindishe Manor School serves a disadvantaged socio-economic catchment area with attainment on entry expected to be below the national expectations

Reading: The progress measure for reading was +0.47. The 18 disadvantaged pupils had a progress measure of -1.55.

Writing: The progress measure for writing was  +3.38. This places the school in the top 11% for progress in writing.

The 18 disadvantaged pupils had a progress measure of +0.76.

Maths: The progress measure for maths was +1.65. The 18 disadvantaged pupils had a progress measure of +0.11

Whereas the pupils with disadvantages made progress above the national in maths and writing, in reading the progress of this group was low and the gap wide. Analysis of the cohort indicates that factors other than entitlement to pupil premium impacted on the progress of a high number of individuals within this group. These factors include severe and special additional learning needs. Of the 18 disadvantaged children 8 made progress above national in reading: 2 children made progress but not as much as expected given their KS1 levels.

Brindishe Lee School serves a mixed socio-economic catchment area with attainment on entry expected to be close to the national expectations

Reading: The progress measure for reading was +2.89. The 10 disadvantaged pupils had a progress measure of +3.78.

Writing: The progress measure for writing was   +5.3. This places the school in the top 3% for progress made in writing. The 10 disadvantaged pupils had a progress measure of +5.58. This places the school in the top 3% for progress made by disadvantaged pupils in writing.

Maths: The progress measure for maths was +1.49. The 10 disadvantaged pupils had a progress measure of +1.15.

At Brindishe Lee pupils with disadvantages made exceptional progress in all three areas.